© 2023 by ASM Washington D.C. Branch
 

Bacteria and viruses by DragonArtz - www.dragonartz.net used under CC BY. Recolored from original.

SPRING 2017 MEETING

ASM Washington, D.C. Branch

April 6, 2017

The ASM Washington D.C. Branch held its 2017 Spring Meeting on April 6, 2017 at George Mason University. There were seven poster presentations and three short oral presentations which are listed below and all ten presenters were given an Amazon Gift Card.


In addition, there was an award for the best poster presentation which went to Ms. Ashwini Brahms of George Mason University and an award for the best oral presentation which went to Ms. Cassandra E. Nelson of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County.

 

Time: 6:00 - 9:00 pm

Branch Lecturer:

Linking Microbes to the Fate of Cold War Era of Heavy Metal Contamination

Dr. Denise M. Akob
U.S. Geological Survey, Reston, VA

Oral Presentations:

Protein phosphatase 1α interacts with Venezuelan Equine Encephalitis Virus capsid

Brian Carey (1), Sergei Nekhai (2), Kylene Kehn-Hall (1)


(1) George Mason University, Manassas, VA
(2) Howard University Washington, DC.

Alterations in the host transcriptome in vitro following Rift Valley Fever Virus infection 

C. Pinkham (1), C. de la Fuente (1), B. Dahal (1), N. Bracci (1), B. Beitzel (2), A. Garrison (2), C. Schmaljohn (2), G. Palacios (2), A. Narayanan (1), C. Campbell (3), K. Kehn-Hall (1)


(1) National Center for Biodefense and Infectious Diseases, School of Systems Biology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA
(2)United States Army Research Institute of Infectious Disease (USAMRIID), Frederick, MD
(3) DCE Consulting, Vienna, VA.

Functional characterization of the -glucosidases in the lignocllulose degrading bacterium Cellovibrio japonicus

Cassandra E. Nelson (1), Artur Rogowski (2), Carl Morland (2), Joshua A Wilhide (1), Harry Gilbert (2), & Jeffrey G. Gardner(1)


(1) University of Maryland Baltimore Maryland, Baltimore, MD
​(2) Newcastle University, Newcastle Upon Tyne, UK.

Poster Presentations:

​The effect of sorafenib on Rift Valley Fever Virus assembly and egress.

Ashwini Brahms (1), Rajini Mudhasani (2), Krishna Kota (2), Chelsea Pinkham (1), Farooq Nassar (2), Rouzbeh Zamani (2), Sina Bavari (2) and Kylene Kehn-Hall (1)


(1) National Center for Biodefense and Infectious Diseases, School of Systems Biology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA, USA 
(2) U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, Frederick, MD, USA

Rapamycin modulation of P70 S6 kinase signaling inhibits Rift Valley Fever Virus pathogenesis.

Todd M. Bell (1), Virginia Espina (2), Svetlana Senina (1), Caitlin Woodson (1), Ashwini Brahms (1), Brian Carey (1), Shih-Chao Lin (1), Lindsay Lundberg (1), Chelsea Pinkham (1), Alan Baer (1), Claudius Mueller (2), Elizabeth A. Chlipala (3), Faye Sharman (3)  Cynthia de la Fuente (1), Lance Liotta (2), Kylene Kehn-Hall (1)


(1) National Center for Biodefense and Infectious Diseases, School of Systems Biology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA
(2)Center for Applied Proteomics and Molecular Medicine, School of Systems Biology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA
(3) Premier Laboratory, LLC, Boulder, CO.

Use of NANOTRAP® technology for the capture and enrichment of Chikungunya Virus in human urine. 

V.M. Callahan (1), B. Carey (1), S-C. Lin (1), B. Lepene (2) and K. Kehn-Hall (1)


(1) National Center for Biodefense and Infectious Diseases, George Mason University, Manassas, VA
(2) Ceres Nanosciences, Manassas, VA.

Next-generation sequence-based typing of Cronobacter  spp. for food and environmental safety.

H. R. Chase (1), G. R. Gopinath (1), J. Gangiredla (1), I. R. Patel (1), Q. Yan (2), V. Sathyamoorthy (1), M. H. Kothary (1), H. N. Cinar (1), L. Carter (1), F. Negrete (1), S. Finklestein (1), H. Jeong (1), K. Han (1), C. Lee (1), S. Fanning (2), C. Iversen (2), R. Stephan (3), A. Eshwar (3), A. Lehner (3), G.Klein (4), F. Pagotto (5), M. Pava-Ripoll (6), B. D. Tall (1)


(1) CFSAN, U. S. FDA., Laurel, MD
(2) Univ. Coll. Dublin, Dublin, Ireland
(3) Inst. for Food Safety and Hygiene, Zurich, Switzerland
(4) Univ. of Vet. Med. Hannover Fndn., Hannover, Germany
(5) Food Directorate, Ottawa, ON, Canada
(6) CFSAN, U. S. Food and Drug Admin., College Park, MD

Prevalence, distribution, and comparative genetics of a hemolysin III gene (COG (1) (2)7 (2)) and related hemolysin genes among Cronobacter spp.  

ChaeYoon Lee (1), HyeJin Jeong (1), HaNa Kwon (1), KyuYoung Han (1), SeonJu Choi (1), SoHyun Kim (1), Jeong Woo Lee (1), Jung Youn Do (1), Samantha Finkelstein (1), (2), Flavia Negrete (1), (2), Hannah R. Chase (1), Isha R. Patel (1), Jayanthi Gangiredla (1), Gopal R. Gopinath (1), and Ben D. Tall (1)


(1) CFSAN, U. S. FDA, Laurel, MD
(2) JIFSAN, University of Maryland, College Park, MD

Phylogenomic analyses of Type II toxin-antitoxin genes in the foodborne pathogen Cronobacter spp. using sequence-based bioinformatics combined with DNA microarray analysis demonstrates an evolutionary shared species-specific line of evolution. 

Samantha Finkelstein (1), (2), Jayanthi Gangiredla (1), Flavia Negrete (1) (1), (2), Hannah R. Chase (1), ChaeYoon Lee (1), HyeJin Jeong (1), Isha R. Patel (1), Gopal R. Gopinath (1), and Ben D. Tall (1)


(1) CFSAN, U. S. FDA, Laurel, MD
(2) JIFSAN, University of Maryland, College Park, MD